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    How to create an ideal marketing value chain for maximum effectiveness

    Last updated 5 years ago

    With over 20 years experience in B2B marketing I've see the good, the bad and the ugly of marketing value chains. Hence I documented my thoughts in this presentation on how to align technical product management and multiple marketing roles including product marketing, integrated marketing, content marketing, creative/web marketing and field marketing.

    I've also provided a great overview from the folks at Pragmatic Marketing, and my own detailed descriptions/examples of a Global Product Marketing Manager [my role at Pfizer] and an Integrated Marketing Manager [my staff at Entrust] to highlight the differences and interplay between the two roles.  

    There are certainly many different ways to structure the marketing value chain and many nuances within each, so please comment with your experiences and suggestions. 

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    Todd Ebert is interested in B2B marketing strategies including the intersection of search, social, local and mobile marketing.  He is SVP Marketing at local online marketing leader ReachLocal.

    How are website designs and school pictures alike?

    Last updated 5 years ago

    We were very excited and proud to launch our new website a few weeks ago. It was a huge task involving 6 sub-sites, 400+ pages, 40+ vertical landing pages, 135+ videos and 1,500+ graphics.  It got me to thinking about our previous site that I loved in 2009 but hated lately. And the fact that reviewing old website designs is like looking at pictures of yourself from high school. At the time you think you're the coolest thing since sliced bread, but then later you look back and think to yourself "wow, that was awful, what was I thinking?!?" So while I'm still enamored with our new site I thought it would be interesting to look at the evolution of the design.  BTW, my non-scientific research indicates that the average "like" phase of a website is around 18 months.

    2012 - The New Site 

    Featuring tons of videos and photos of real customers and employees. Authentic and optimized for lead generation. Integrated with our social presence and featuring a learning center with content on best practices in online marketing. 

    2009

    The Flash video and color-based navigation seemed like such a good idea at the time. 

    2008 

    A slight makeover from 2007 but what's up with the vines growing around the bottom call-outs?

    2007

    Wow, that's a crazy combo of black, orange, aqua and mustard fonts.

    2005-2006

    Update to the original with even more copy!

    2004

    The original site. All websites looked like this back then but it still makes me wonder how we thought they looked good.  

    My simple, cheap and easy suggestion for creating lots of brand advocates and referral business

    Last updated 5 years ago

    I took my team to Pole Positon Raceway [ @racep2r ] this week as a thankyou for their many late nights and weekends of hard work developing our new corporate website.  It was my first visit and I was extremely impressed with every aspect of the place from the iPad based registration to the intro video to the queuing to the racing to the score cards with rank/graph against others.  Not only was the place very well run but the racing was really fun and fast [45 mph].  

    This experience got me thinking about how local businesses create brand advocates today.  In the past it was hard to get referrals but now with social media it can happen in an instant [and the reverse is true also in that a bad experience is reported immediately]. As an example, some of our team took pictures/videos and posted them to Facebook on the spot with comments about what a great time they had.  I found it interesting though that Pole Position [and nearly all businesses I go to] don't overtly ask customers to share their experiences.  Small business owners will tell you that their most valuable marketing is referrals and word-of-mouth, yet they don't do anything to drive that behavior.  Why not have signs around the place saying "Having a good time? Please Tweet/Facebook about it."  Or "If you use Flickr, Instagram or YouTube please take some pics/videos and share them."  It's 100% free advertising by happy customers to dozens/hundreds/thousands of their friends who are way more likely to try the place based on the endorsement.  

    And don't forget the huge SEO and reputation bonus of all that content indexed on Google for your business name. It's truly win/win and costs just a few bucks for the signage -- or nothing for staff to simply ask people who look like they are having a good time -- and even volunteer to take the video/group shot for them. 

    Tip to Pole Position Raceway Frisco: You need to create a Facebook fan page and Twitter page for the Frisco, TX location where you can and market the your leagues, special events and offers, driving even more fans and referred customers.  

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    Ever wonder how Google makes it's billions? Simple, it's called a bidding war. #google

    Last updated 5 years ago

    We all know that Google is the search engine of choice for most people [65% market share].  But have you ever wondered how they make $30+ billion in revenue and a whopping $10+ billion in profit [30% margin!!!!]?  

    It's simple. They created a market where companies who want traffic/leads bid against each other for the prime ad space on the search results page for key phrases people use to search for things.  

    Check out the infographic below by Wordstream for some of the most competitive bid categories like insurance and mortgage.  Those companies can afford to spend $45 for each consumer click [CPC] because of the high lifetime value of a customer [i.e. the bank makes tens of thousands in interest on your mortgage].  But don't forget that there are millions of other search terms that that companies buy which might not be as competitive but they drive a huge volume of searches and consequently a lot of revenue/profit to Google [e.g. Thai restaurat, AC repair, emergency vet, etc.].

    In case you missed them the first time...my favorite blog posts of 2011

    Last updated 5 years ago

    Todd Ebert is interested in B2B marketing strategies including the intersection of search, social, local and mobile marketing.  He is SVP Marketing at local online marketing leader ReachLocal.

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